Female Cardinals Hide

While bright red male Cardinals seem purposefully to expose themselves on open branches, possibly to make attracting females easier, the girls stay more hidden in brush and tree branches. In many incidences, that makes them harder to photograph.

In fact, since earlier in the Spring this season, I’ve gotten one good chance at capturing a female in the only place I’m able to photograph — the backyard of our apartment building.

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Female Cardinals are a good example of how bright coloration favors the male in the bird world, probably for the reason mentioned above: being the mating aggressor, the male needs to be seen more readily for purposes of necessary attraction.

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In the second photo, this same female has gone down closer to the riverbank (note the rocks) in search of nesting materials. She holds a tiny branch in her beak.

Butterfly or Moth?

These little white fliers are everywhere, seemingly all at once! Photographing them takes a bit of patience, as they don’t stay long at one spot on a flower, or a weed, or in the grass. They’re very common, but are they a butterfly, or a moth-like species?

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Cedar Waxwings Return

Last Summer we twice experienced a flock of Cedar Waxwings visiting our backyard, once in May, and again later in the season. But this year, they have been few and far between, although apparently not far away, as I caught this beauty with nesting and/or food material in her beak as she passed through.

The black mask for which the species is known is clearly visible in this close-up.

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Chasing Cardinals

Learning to whistle like a Cardinal actually gets results in luring those birds to perch closer to your camera range. They work their way closer to you as you continue to whistle in reply to them. Here are a few decent shots I got of our Cardinal friends visiting the riverbank trees behind our apartment building.

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The fellow in the large left photo below was caught preening, and I thought he looked more like a parrot when I captured him in this pose fairly close in front of me on a low bush on the riverbank.

A Wing Abnormality

This particular Robin is easily recognizable in our backyard in Napoleon, Ohio, as he/she has a abnormality, or some sort of break, in her wing. The white portion showing within her back feathers isn’t a blossom. It’s part of her wing, and if you look closely, you can see a portion of feather bone lying across that white patch. She, however, functions normally, and gave birth to a brood this Spring.

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