Powerful Wings

When a Great Blue Heron’s instinct to fly off is obeyed, his wings literally appear to grow out from his body as they come unfurled before straightening completely to gain more lift.

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The amazing, powerful-looking connection of bone structure to body and wing is apparent, here (ABOVE). Also visible are the stout, brownish-yellowish upper legs and the long, black skinny lower legs to which are attached stick-like feet that allow this bird to walk steadily in the water as he searches for fish.

*****Credit:
Out-of-camera photos from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

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Great Blue Herons and White Egrets Fish Their Fill

If you’ve never watched a Great Blue Heron, or a White Egret, fish, you’ve missed some wonderful entertainment.

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Both these hardy fishing birds have substantially long beaks which they use amazingly easily to snatch swimming fish (Close-up ABOVE).

The snaps (BELOW) show that the heron occasionally will swim around branches, rocks, or other river obstacles, to hunt for his fish.

(BELOW): Once disturbed, off the big bird goes to another favorite fishing spot!

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The snaps (BELOW) of a White Egret were taken from the other side of the width of the Maumee River, north of the bridge at Napoleon, Ohio.

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(BELOW): An Egret generally changes his fishing venue more often than a heron, even if not provoked. He will fly-hop along the shoreline to find suitable fishing locations.

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*****
Credit:
All Photos in “My Special Photos” are out-of-camera and completely un-retouched from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

 

 

 

Flying Around

With my limited equipment (described on the “About” page of this blog), it is interesting to discover the number of feathered friends we have behind our apartment building along the Maumee River.

Here are a few visitors:

Well, perhaps these aren’t all feathered! 🙂

A scavenger hawk, a pigeon in full wing upswing, and herring gulls shared the sky with a “silver bird”.

Canada Geese are a common bird flying around the territory.

Grackles invade berry-bearing trees, and sometimes look like jet fighters in the air.

Gulls fly along the river in singles, pairs, and groups, sometimes dipping quite low over the bridge.

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Pigeons that roost atop the pilings under the bridge fly a daily ritual around, under, and above the bridge, and to the nearby downtown Courthouse and back.

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By far the most frequent flyers along the river are the various gulls.

Except for “silver-birded” humans, of course!