Isolated Photos from Original Pictures

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This photo (ABOVE) of four Canada Geese flying over the tree-tops offered a chance to create several other pictures simply by working out some blowup isolations.

In the first picture (BELOW) the two middle geese are isolated to create a new photo via blowup. The blowup clearly allows one to observe the top goose’s feet, which have yet to be tucked in during the beginning of his flight.

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A blowup of the lower three geese follows (BELOW):

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(BELOW) is the final blowup created from the lowest bird in the original shot of four Canada Geese.

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More of the same may be seen and discussed at this earlier post.

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Credit:
Photos and Blowups from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

 

 

 

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Walking On Water

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Watching Canada Geese come and go on water is a photographic challenge because they do it more quickly than the other two birds pictured — Skimmer gull (ABOVE) and, especially, the White Egret (second picture BELOW).

The Skimmer sort of glides (skims) along as he scoops his beak down to snag a fish, then sprouts his wings to get up in the air with his prey. The fellow pictured here missed the fish he spotted and left to search elsewhere.

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The White Egret is a very patient fishing machine. He will stand in one spot for many minutes at a time before he hops up and floats to another location a short distance away. He’s an easy photo op once his habits are learned.

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Canada Geese do everything seemingly frantically as they approach, or leave the water, so their quick movements are hard to follow with amateur photography equipment.

These photos were all taken at the Maumee River near the bridge in Napoleon, Ohio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Birds In the Air

The Great Blue Heron (BELOW) is a shadow in the sky above the bridge in Napoleon, Ohio. Notice how his long, long neck is pulled into an “S” as he flies high. The heron’s equally long legs and stick feet fly straight out behind him as he glides along.

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(BELOW): When he lifts off, the Great Blue Heron displays beautiful, incredibly huge wings of purple-blue edging and relatively small, fan-like tail feathers.

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(BELOW): Pigeons that live under the bridge give their own impression of shades against the sky. They regularly give a fly-by show around and under the bridge as a troupe.

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(BELOW): The Great Egret shares fishing space with the Great Blue Heron. They rarely argue on territorial water rights.

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(BELOW): Notice the Great Blue Heron’s head is straight up, and that’s because he/she just watched the Great Egret fly over his/her head and land in front of him/her.

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Turkey Vultures, or “buzzards”, as the ones (BELOW) are easily recognized on the ground for their red, bare-skinned heads. But in high flight, they display silver-gray outer flight feathers and black feathers in front, while their white, short beaks are more visible than their red heads. Highly predatory, Turkey Vultures flap and soar in circles above prospective ground prey.

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(BELOW): Geese fly above the Maumee River at Napoleon, Ohio.

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Geese Gathering

Last evening, my geese gaggle decided to invade the low-lying yards along the Maumee River’s shoreline just SouthWest of the bridge. They climbed up the rocky embankment, using their wings as balancing tools, then gathered in the delicacies offered within the groomed and grassy, golden yards.

Getting ready for the embankment climb

Getting ready for the embankment climb

King of the yard!

King of the yard!

Just an embankment between him and Kingship!

Just an embankment between him and Kingship!

Then there was this fellow (series of seven pictures above) who kept approaching the embankment but was unable to find his climbing courage. Finally, cleverly, he found a much less steep slope to negotiate.

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All in all, a good time was had by all!

On the Pond

Last night on the Pond (Maumee River) there drifted a gaggle of 85-plus Canada Geese. Huddled at the Eastern side of the bridge, they were supposedly taking advantage of a large tree/log jam underneath the structure that resulted in a pond-like area near the shoreline. However, it was too dark for one to snap any photos of the paddling birds.

In the morning, I returned to the area to see how many were left. The geese gaggle had just flown the coop and landed a ways off on the Western side of the bridge.

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On the bridge’s Eastern side, a little group of Mallards were hanging together.

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In the meantime, some straggling geese made a bee-line for the main hive:

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Ah, the Pond, where mates are made and tag-along friends are welcome, too!