Isolated Photos from Original Pictures

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This photo (ABOVE) of four Canada Geese flying over the tree-tops offered a chance to create several other pictures simply by working out some blowup isolations.

In the first picture (BELOW) the two middle geese are isolated to create a new photo via blowup. The blowup clearly allows one to observe the top goose’s feet, which have yet to be tucked in during the beginning of his flight.

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A blowup of the lower three geese follows (BELOW):

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(BELOW) is the final blowup created from the lowest bird in the original shot of four Canada Geese.

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More of the same may be seen and discussed at this earlier post.

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Credit:
Photos and Blowups from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

 

 

 

Graduated Blowups

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In amateur photography, a lot of fun can be had in simply blowing up photos in  graduating sizes. It can be an educational process, as well. Sometimes when focus on a subject seems certain, one can learn from a blowup that he wasn’t quite as focused in for his shot as he thought. Blowups can teach one something, after all.

The first picture in this post of a Canada Goose was isolated from the original picture of two birds (BELOW) and blown up to feature him alone.

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And (BELOW) are two other blowups in graduated sizes also made from the original picture.

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In digital photography, one may easily recognize that focus must be absolute to ensure a focused blowup. As demonstrated in these particular blowups, although the first picture of the two birds together looks quite focused, there is considerable pixel loss in the graduating blowups, causing a loss of focus that at first seemed certain.

A correctly focused example follows (BELOW):

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The original photo was taken right through the railing of the bridge, while the camera was focused correctly on the geese. The railing faded out and the geese stayed in focus as the camera followed them. Therefore, the two graduated blowups are perfectly in focus on the geese, as well.

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Credit:
Photos and blowups from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg.

 

Walking On Water

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Watching Canada Geese come and go on water is a photographic challenge because they do it more quickly than the other two birds pictured — Skimmer gull (ABOVE) and, especially, the White Egret (second picture BELOW).

The Skimmer sort of glides (skims) along as he scoops his beak down to snag a fish, then sprouts his wings to get up in the air with his prey. The fellow pictured here missed the fish he spotted and left to search elsewhere.

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The White Egret is a very patient fishing machine. He will stand in one spot for many minutes at a time before he hops up and floats to another location a short distance away. He’s an easy photo op once his habits are learned.

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Canada Geese do everything seemingly frantically as they approach, or leave the water, so their quick movements are hard to follow with amateur photography equipment.

These photos were all taken at the Maumee River near the bridge in Napoleon, Ohio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eagle Snaps

001Somehow my little red camera and I finally got closer to the Eagle traffic flying across the bridge at Napoleon, Ohio!

My subject looks to be an older juvenile, judging from the mottling still present on his magnificent wings and the spotting on his head. Eagles can live as long as 30 years, and they don’t acquire their full coloring until after the age of four.

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What Is It?

Name this fishing bird (BELOW):

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Many species of birds visit the river behind our apartment building. The one pictured can dive completely under water from a swimming position to catch fish. He swims low in the water and uses his tail feathers as a fanned rudder while he trys to locate his dinner.

His fan tail, hooked beak, and black-webbed feet (not visible in this photo) identify him as a juvenile Cormorant.

 

Take-Off Flight Sequence of Heron

The Great Blue Heron has an amazing take-off sequence. A wingspan of 77 to 82 inches flaps him into flight.

Involuntarily hitting the shutter on my Canon PowerShot SX410 IS with 40X Optical Zoom in different times — quickly, normally slowly, and abnormally slowly — I captured pictures of a Great Blue Heron in a patterned sequence of take-off and resulting flight.

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(ABOVE): This is an incredibly lucky shot! The heron has used his skinny, long stick feet to push himself slightly forward and out of the water. (See the water dripping heavily down below him.) His wings are in the first take-off motion, with most of the wings in a flapped down position from which he is about to swing them upward to gain more lift.

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(ABOVE): In the second flight sequence, the heron shoots his wings fully upward and folds his eight stick feet (four on each leg) closely together in preparation for lifting himself into full flight. His head and neck remain high, here, and his legs are dangling while his feet shake off water.

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(ABOVE): Low over the river and pulling in his rudders (legs and feet) straight behind him, the heron has fully launched himself out of the water (third sequence) in a forward push. To give himself momentum and speed, he has lowered and leveled his wings.

At every take-off from the water, the Great Blue Heron uses the same basic three-part sequence to become airborne.