Birds In the Air

The Great Blue Heron (BELOW) is a shadow in the sky above the bridge in Napoleon, Ohio. Notice how his long, long neck is pulled into an “S” as he flies high. The heron’s equally long legs and stick feet fly straight out behind him as he glides along.

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(BELOW): When he lifts off, the Great Blue Heron displays beautiful, incredibly huge wings of purple-blue edging and relatively small, fan-like tail feathers.

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(BELOW): Pigeons that live under the bridge give their own impression of shades against the sky. They regularly give a fly-by show around and under the bridge as a troupe.

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(BELOW): The Great Egret shares fishing space with the Great Blue Heron. They rarely argue on territorial water rights.

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(BELOW): Notice the Great Blue Heron’s head is straight up, and that’s because he/she just watched the Great Egret fly over his/her head and land in front of him/her.

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Turkey Vultures, or “buzzards”, as the ones (BELOW) are easily recognized on the ground for their red, bare-skinned heads. But in high flight, they display silver-gray outer flight feathers and black feathers in front, while their white, short beaks are more visible than their red heads. Highly predatory, Turkey Vultures flap and soar in circles above prospective ground prey.

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(BELOW): Geese fly above the Maumee River at Napoleon, Ohio.

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Flying Around

With my limited equipment (described on the “About” page of this blog), it is interesting to discover the number of feathered friends we have behind our apartment building along the Maumee River.

Here are a few visitors:

Well, perhaps these aren’t all feathered! 🙂

A scavenger hawk, a pigeon in full wing upswing, and herring gulls shared the sky with a “silver bird”.

Canada Geese are a common bird flying around the territory.

Grackles invade berry-bearing trees, and sometimes look like jet fighters in the air.

Gulls fly along the river in singles, pairs, and groups, sometimes dipping quite low over the bridge.

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Pigeons that roost atop the pilings under the bridge fly a daily ritual around, under, and above the bridge, and to the nearby downtown Courthouse and back.

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By far the most frequent flyers along the river are the various gulls.

Except for “silver-birded” humans, of course!